Tag Archives: Grants

Free Government Grants for Low-Income Families, low income grants.#Low #income #grants

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Free Government Grants for Low-Income Families

Low income grants

Unemployment and a bad economy have put many families into the low-income category. Struggling families trying to make it financially can turn to the government for financial and social services. There are hundreds of grants and subsidies available to low-income families for food, money and housing. Taking advantage of these programs can be as simple as knowing where to look and filling out some forms.

Section 8 Housing

Section 8 housing is a federal program administered by the states. It provides rental assistance to low-income families in the way of rental vouchers. The vouchers, provided by the local housing authorities, allow you to obtain housing in communities instead of public housing complexes. According to Federal Money Retriever, the program helps low-income families and individuals find safe, quality housing. The Public Housing Act combines housing programs for rental assistance offered by Section 8 into one market-driven program. It improves tenant assistance, increases the success by providing low-income families cheap housing and expands housing choices.

Low-Income Energy Grant

Low-income families can receive help with energy bills under the low-income home energy program. Families that make less than 150% above the poverty level are eligible. This federal grant program administered through local and state agencies helps low-income families pay their immediate energy needs. According to the Department of Health and Human Services, states may apply for a portion of the block grant to help low-income households meet the cost of immediate and emergency household energy bills. The funds, distributed depending on the state’s weather and population, go to where they will do the most good.

Nutritional Assistance

The Food and Nutrition Service, or FNS—offered to low-income families in the way of the supplemental nutritional assistance program, school meal programs, summer food service programs and others—assures that low-income individuals receive proper nutrition. Administered by state, local and community organizations, the FNS provides better opportunities to beat childhood hunger, reduce obesity and increase access to the anti-hunger programs and safety networks. In addition to government partnerships, the Food and Nutrition Service has partnerships with community food banks, faith-based organizations and anti-hunger programs.


Housing Grants for Low Income Families, Home Guides, SF Gate, low income grants.#Low #income #grants

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Housing Grants for Low Income Families

The federal government, state agencies and nonprofits throughout the nation offer housing grants for families who fall under certain income limits. Most of the programs are funded by the U.S. Housing and Urban Development, HUD, and U.S. Department of Agriculture, USDA. Others are funded by donations from the general public and administered by charities.

Salvation Army

Depending on United Way funding, the Salvation Army offers rental and mortgage assistance. Applicants must present an eviction notice, proof of income, photo ID, Social Security card for each member of the family, and, if required, proof that only $200 or less remains to be paid for the current month’s rent or mortgage. Although the maximum assistance is generally $200, additional funding may be provided to those displaced from FEMA declared natural disaster areas. In addition, the Salvation Army provides long-term managed assistance for qualified individuals who were displaced from their homes due to flooding in certain geographic areas.

Rural Housing

HUD provides funding to states for rural housing grants. Very-low, low and moderate income level families may apply. Income limitations are based on a percentage of the median for the area. Rental, repair and ownership grants may be available in areas meeting rural criteria. Generally, rural areas include open country, cities with under 10,000 residents and certain cities with a maximum population of 20,000. Grant amounts vary depending on the area and need. For more specific details, contact the local HUD Public Housing Authority, or PHA, or call HUD at 800-569-4287.

Vouchers Programs

HUD offers housing grants to qualified low-income families in the form of vouchers for renting or homeownership assistance. Previously termed Section 8 Housing, the Housing Choice Voucher Program allows eligible low-income families choices as to where they want to live. HUD’s Homeownership Vouchers Program provides grants to eligible first-time home buyers. Grants may provide down payments on home loans, mortgage payment assistance and help paying for living expenses. Grant receivers may not have owned property for the previous three years and must live in the home as their primary residence. To apply, contact a HUD-approved PHA.

State Homeless Grants

States typically distribute federal funding for homeless programs to counties or municipal departments or approved businesses and non-profit organizations. The funding provides grants to eligible area families to address homeless or potentially homeless situations. Homeless families receive assistance for food, housing and medical expenses due to emergency needs. Those who are in danger of eviction may also receive assistance. Either call or visit a state’s Public Housing Authority for programs available in that state.

Disabled Vouchers

HUD provides grant assistance to eligible disabled individuals through its Designated Housing Vouchers program. Non-elderly, low-income families that include a member with disabilities who live in public housing designated for occupancy are eligible for this program. Qualified disabled individuals living alone may also apply for these vouchers. These families or individuals are enrolled into this voucher program as a special admission. Apply to the local PHA for this program.


Low Income Loans, Grants – Benefits – Low Income Financial Help, low income grants.#Low #income

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low income grants

There is no doubt that many American families are battling to cope financially at the moment – the cost of living seems to continue to soar while incomes stay flat or even decrease. If you are a low-income earner living pay check to pay check and are constantly worried about money, there is help available. Fortunately, the government and many non-profit organizations have put financial programs in place to help reduce some of these costs.

Below is a list of options for low income loans along with benefits and grants to assist with financial pressures.

Low Income Loan Options – One challenge low income earners and those with poor credit face is the ability to access cash for various expenses. If you need financial assistance beyond what grants and benefits can provide, there are reasonable loan options available; beyond payday loans. Visit our low interest loans section to review options.

Popular Benefits and Grants

Self-Sufficiency Grants A huge issue for many Americans are those who become victims of financial threshold limits. There are thousands of individuals and families who work and make just enough that they become ineligible for many financial assistance programs. It really brings the phrase “living pay check to pay check “to life.

ModestNeeds.org is a non-profit that helps Americans who fall into the above situation -hard workers who make just enough to be excluded from many financial assistance programs. They provide grants for unexpected emergencies and monthly bills. These are grants and not loans so do not need to be repaid.

Weatherization Assistance The Department of Energy has a weatherization assistance program in place designed to help people in many different areas of the country who cannot afford to weatherize their homes. The organization works with local governments and agencies to bring the most effective energy efficient technology to the underprivileged. They have helped more than 7 million American families since the inception of the program.

FHA Loans In order to buy a home, you will first need to find a company that is willing to offer you a mortgage program. The HUD (Department of Housing and Urban Development) has a very detailed method that outlines all the steps you need to take to purchase a home. The program helps you through all the steps from figuring out your budget and loan amount to getting inspections done and closing the deals. The FHA loans offered are perfect for any family struggling with their finances.

Rental Assistance Not every American owns a house. This is why the government found it important to create a rental assistance scheme for people in need. There are three main assistance programs. You can receive help from HUD where they subsidize your rent from apartment owners (they get the rent lowered for you and pay a little bit). Secondly, the public housing program provides a large amount of apartments for the elderly, impoverished, and people with disabilities at affordable prices. Lastly, the Section 8 program allows you to get a voucher that can be used to pay for a portion or all of the rent at select locations.

School Meals For Kids No child should have to go to school and be hungry which is why the FNS (Food and Nutrition Service) has implemented several programs to help feed hungry kids. These programs are geared towards families that cannot afford to send their children to school with food everyday. They include the National School Lunch Program, the School Breakfast Program, the Child and Adult Care Food Program, the Summer Food Service Program, the Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program, and the Special Milk Program. Find out which ones are available in your state today.

Unemployment Insurance Just because you are out of a job doesn’t mean you have to suffer. As long as you qualify for the UI program offered by the Department of Labor, by actively seeking employment and having been fired for something that was not your fault, you can claim the benefits. Check the Department of Labor’s website for eligibility details by clicking the link above.

Employment and Training Assistance If you are unemployed and are having a hard time getting a job, there is a program designed to help you get back on your feet. This program offers help by allowing you access to education and training programs, professional and occupational certification and licensing, as well as financial aid.

Farm Loans If you are a farmer in dire need of financial and government support, the FSA loan programs may be right for you. They are loans designed to help repair, renovate, improve, and expand farms and ranches across the US. To find out if you qualify for assistance click the link above.


USDA Loans and Grants for Single Family Home Repair, home grants for low income families.#Home

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Loans and Grants for Single Family Home Repair

Home grants for low income families

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) offers low-interest loans and grants to very-low-income homeowners in eligible rural areas for certain improvements to their homes. Specifically, the USDA’s Single Family Housing Repair Loans and Grants Program offers:

  • Loans to qualified very-low-income homeowners to repair, improve, or modernize their homes. Loans may be used to repair, improve, or modernize the home, or to remove health and safety hazards from the home.
  • Grants to qualified elderly very-low-income homeowners. Grants must be used to remove health and safety hazards from the home.

Who Can Apply?

In order to qualify for loans or grants, applicants must:

  • Be the homeowner and actually live in the home;
  • Be a citizen of the United States or reside in the United States after having been granted legal permanent resident (green card) status;
  • Be financially unable to obtain affordable credit elsewhere;
  • Have a combined family income below 50% of the area median income; and
  • For grants, be age 62 or older and be financially unable to repay a conventional home repair loan.

What is an Eligible Area?

USDA Single Family Housing Repair Loans and Grants Program loans and grants are generally available to homeowners in rural areas with community populations of less than 35,000. The USDA provides a web page where prospective applicants can check their address to determine their eligibility online.

Within the population limit, loans and grants are available in all 50 states, Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, Guam, American Samoa, the Northern Mariana s and the Trust Territories of the Pacific Islands.

How Much Money is Available?

Loans of up to $20,000 and grants of up to $7,500 are available.

However, a person age 62 or older may be eligible for combined loans and grants totaling up to $27,500.

What are the Terms of the Loans or Grants?

Compared to conventional home repair loans, with interest rates averaging over 4.5%, the terms of the USDA loans are very attractive.

  • Loan interest rates are fixed at 1%.
  • Loans can be repaid over a period of 20 years.
  • Full title service is required for loans of $7,500 or more. (Title service fees are costs associated with issuing a title insurance policy for the lender.)
  • Grants have a lifetime limit of $7,500.
  • Grants do not have to be repaid unless the house is sold in less than 3 years.
  • If the applicant can repay part, but not all of the costs, the applicant may be offered a combination of a loan and a grant.

Are There Deadlines to Apply?

As long as Congress continues to fund the program in the annual federal budget, applications for the loans and grants can be submitted year around.

How Long Does the Application Take?

Applications for loans and grants are processed in the order they are received. Processing times may vary depending on the availability of funds in the applicant’s area.

How Do You Apply?

To begin the process, applicants should meet with a USDA home loan specialist in their area for help with the application.

What Laws Govern this Program?

The Single Family Housing Repair Loans and Grants Program is authorized and regulated under the Housing Act of 1949 as amended (7 CFR, Part 3550) and House Bill HB-1-3550 – Direct Single Family Housing Loans and Grants Field Office Handbook.

Note: Since the above laws are subject to amendment, applicants should contact USDA home loan specialist in their area for current program details.


Low Income Grants, grants for low income families.#Grants #for #low #income #families

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Low Income Grants

If you are struggling to make ends meet, you are not alone. With today’s economy, there are so many Americans in low paying jobs that just don’t provide enough money to pay the bills and cover daily living expenses too. The US government understands this dilemma and wants to help you out with a low-income grant. These grants are available to cover housing, childcare, and even the cost of college tuition if you want to further your education. Read on below for more details on the low-income grants available and how to apply for them.

Low-Income Housing Grants

Paying your rent or mortgage payment each month is no small expense. In fact, most Americans spend far more than the recommended 30% of their salary on housing. With such a large portion of your salary being sucked away into your housing, this leaves little left over to cover bills, daily living expenses, and not to mention savings for your future. Low-income housing grants are available to help ease this financial burden and ensure that adequate housing is available to all. There are a variety of different low-income housing grants depending on your unique needs including low-income grants to cover rent; mortgage payments; public housing; shelter expenses, etc. This federal aid can be found through the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development, otherwise known as the HUD.

Childcare Grants

The government offers financial assistance to a wide variety of families in purchasing child care. Families may need financial aid due to low incomes, medical problems, early parenting, or other problems that have resulted in low disposable income. Child care financial assistance can cover child care in a licensed child care center; in a licensed family child care home; by a relative of the child in the relative s home; or by an approved person in the child s home.

Education Grants

Low-income individuals can qualify for several different federally funded education grants to help pay for the cost of schooling. Don’t let money stand in the way of your getting an education. You can apply for a federal Pell Grant that based on your family income will award you up to $5,300 in free money to pay your tuition and some of the associated living expenses while in school. You can also qualify for additional education grants based on ethnicity, a disability, area of study, etc.

How To Apply

To access an updated list of current federal low-income grants you can apply for a free government grant kit. This kit will walk you through all the grants available, show you which ones you qualify for and even help you through the application process if you are unsure of what to do. Simply click on the link below and fill in your address and you can be on your way to getting a free government grant in no time at all.

Grants for low income families

Get A Free Grant Assistance KitGrants for low income families

To start your application for a free grant package go to:

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Very Low to Moderate Income Housing Loans, home grants for low income families.#Home #grants #for

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Very Low to Moderate Income Housing Loans

Home grants for low income families

The following is a summary of information about low to moderate income housing loans available to individuals or families through the U.S. Department of Agriculture s Rural Development program as listed in the Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA).

During fiscal year 2015, a total of $18.7 billion in loans were granted. The average direct loan granted was for $125,226 while the average guaranteed loan was for $136,360.

VERY LOW TO MODERATE INCOME HOUSING LOANS

CATEGORY: Housing Assistance

To assist very low, low-income, and moderate-income households to obtain modest, decent, safe, and sanitary housing for use as a permanent residence in rural areas.

Types of Assistance

Direct Loans; Guaranteed/Insured Loans.

Uses and Restrictions

Direct and guaranteed loans may be used to buy, build, or improve the applicant s permanent residence. New manufactured homes may be financed when they are on a permanent site, purchased from an approved dealer or contractor, and meet certain other requirements. Under very limited circumstances, homes may be re-financed with direct loans. Dwellings financed must be modest, decent, safe, and sanitary. The value of a home financed with a direct loan may not exceed the area limit. The property must be located in an eligible rural area. Assistance is available in the States, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, Guam, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of Northern Mariana s, and the Trust Territories of the Pacific Islands.

Direct loans are made at the interest rate specified in RD Instruction 440.1, Exhibit B (available in any Rural Development local office), and are repaid over 33 years or 38 years for applicants whose adjusted annual income does not exceed 60 percent of the area median income, if necessary to show repayment ability.

Payment assistance is granted on direct loans to reduce the installment to an effective interest rate as low as one percent, depending on adjusted family income. Payment assistance is subject to recapture by the government when the customer no longer resides in the dwelling. There is no funding provided for deferred mortgage authority or loans for deferred mortgage assumptions. Guaranteed loans may be made to refinance either existing RHS Guaranteed Housing loans or RHS Section 502 Direct Housing loans. Guaranteed loans are amortized over 30 years. The interest rate is negotiated with the lender.

Eligibility Requirements

Applicants must have very low-, low- or moderate incomes. Very low-income is defined as below 50 percent of the area median income (AMI), low-income is between 50 and 80 percent of AMI; moderate income is below 115 percent of AMI. Families must be without adequate housing, but able to afford the housing payments, including principal, interest, taxes, and insurance (PITI). Qualifying repayment ratios are 29 percent for PITI to 41 percent for total debt. In addition, applicants must be unable to obtain credit elsewhere, yet have an acceptable credit history.

Beneficiary Eligibility

Applicants must meet eligibility requirements.

Guaranteed Loan Low and Moderate income eligible.

Credentials/Documentation

Applicants may need to submit evidence of inability to obtain credit elsewhere, verification of income, debts, and other information on the application; plans, specifications, and cost estimates. This program is excluded from coverage under 2 CFR 200, Subpart E – Cost Principles.

Application Procedures

This program is excluded from coverage under 2 CFR 200, Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards. For direct loans, application is made at the Rural Development field office serving the county where the dwelling is or will be located. For guaranteed loans, application is made to a participating private lender.

Award Procedure

Rural Development field offices have authority to approve most Direct loan requests.

Processing of guaranteed loans varies in each State. Consult your local telephone directory under U.S. Department of Agriculture for a Rural Development field office listing or visit the website http://offices.sc.egov.usda.gov/lcoator/app for a State Office listing. If no backlog exists, decisions on direct loan applications are made within 30 to 60 days. Requests for guarantee loans are acted upon in 3 days of receipt of the lender s request for guarantee.

Range of Approval/Disapproval Time

For direct loans, from 30 to 60 days subject to availability of funds, from the time the application is filed if no backlog of applications exists. A pre-qualification may be provided to potential direct loan applicants upon call or visit to a Rural Development office, though results are not binding. For guarantees, a decision is required within 3 days of loan package submission by the approved lender.

Information Contacts

Regional or Local Office Consult your local telephone directory under United States Department of Agriculture for Rural Development field office number. If no listing, contact appropriate Rural Development State Office listed in Appendix IV of the Catalog or on the internet at http://www.rurdev.usda.gov/recd_map.html.

Headquarters Office Director, Single Family Housing Direct Loan Division or Director Single Family Housing Guaranteed Loan Division, Rural Housing Service (RHS), Department of Agriculture, Washington, DC 20250. Telephone: (202) 720-1474 (direct loans), (202) 720-1452 (guaranteed loans).


Housing Grants for Low Income Families, Home Guides, SF Gate, grants for low income families.#Grants

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Housing Grants for Low Income Families

The federal government, state agencies and nonprofits throughout the nation offer housing grants for families who fall under certain income limits. Most of the programs are funded by the U.S. Housing and Urban Development, HUD, and U.S. Department of Agriculture, USDA. Others are funded by donations from the general public and administered by charities.

Salvation Army

Depending on United Way funding, the Salvation Army offers rental and mortgage assistance. Applicants must present an eviction notice, proof of income, photo ID, Social Security card for each member of the family, and, if required, proof that only $200 or less remains to be paid for the current month’s rent or mortgage. Although the maximum assistance is generally $200, additional funding may be provided to those displaced from FEMA declared natural disaster areas. In addition, the Salvation Army provides long-term managed assistance for qualified individuals who were displaced from their homes due to flooding in certain geographic areas.

Rural Housing

HUD provides funding to states for rural housing grants. Very-low, low and moderate income level families may apply. Income limitations are based on a percentage of the median for the area. Rental, repair and ownership grants may be available in areas meeting rural criteria. Generally, rural areas include open country, cities with under 10,000 residents and certain cities with a maximum population of 20,000. Grant amounts vary depending on the area and need. For more specific details, contact the local HUD Public Housing Authority, or PHA, or call HUD at 800-569-4287.

Vouchers Programs

HUD offers housing grants to qualified low-income families in the form of vouchers for renting or homeownership assistance. Previously termed Section 8 Housing, the Housing Choice Voucher Program allows eligible low-income families choices as to where they want to live. HUD’s Homeownership Vouchers Program provides grants to eligible first-time home buyers. Grants may provide down payments on home loans, mortgage payment assistance and help paying for living expenses. Grant receivers may not have owned property for the previous three years and must live in the home as their primary residence. To apply, contact a HUD-approved PHA.

State Homeless Grants

States typically distribute federal funding for homeless programs to counties or municipal departments or approved businesses and non-profit organizations. The funding provides grants to eligible area families to address homeless or potentially homeless situations. Homeless families receive assistance for food, housing and medical expenses due to emergency needs. Those who are in danger of eviction may also receive assistance. Either call or visit a state’s Public Housing Authority for programs available in that state.

Disabled Vouchers

HUD provides grant assistance to eligible disabled individuals through its Designated Housing Vouchers program. Non-elderly, low-income families that include a member with disabilities who live in public housing designated for occupancy are eligible for this program. Qualified disabled individuals living alone may also apply for these vouchers. These families or individuals are enrolled into this voucher program as a special admission. Apply to the local PHA for this program.


College Grants for Low Income Students – Those with Bad Credit Ratings, grants for low

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Low Income or Bad Credit Education Grants

If you are struggling to pay your tuition and other college costs, you are not alone. Unless you have an education nest-egg stashed away, or parents that are well-budgeted for college, you re probably looking for student aid to ease the financial burden of earning a college degree.

Loans are financing options that cover your expenses today, in return for repayment (with interest) tomorrow. The cost of college goes well beyond tuition and books, so loans are used to keep students afloat during school. Living expenses including rent, transportation and groceries are real-life reminders that independence is expensive. It is not uncommon to borrow money for school, but remember that student loans add to your debt load once you graduate.

Grants and scholarships are key financial aid resources, because money you earn does not require repayment.

Scholarships are typically merit-based awards, which are distributed based on student achievement and performance. Popular scholarships are tied to athletics and academics, but others take into account charitable contributions and civil activism. A range of qualifications are applied to scholarship candidacy, in combinations that might require eligible applicants to stand-out in more ways than one.

Most scholarships, especially renewable awards, impose GPA requirements that students must maintain to remain eligible. Financial need is sometimes considered by scholarship administrators, but it is usually secondary to performance.

Grants, on the other hand, are primarily need-based. Students who need the money most are targeted first for college grants. And since most grants come from government agencies, there is no credit check required for application. If your credit is bad or your income is low, government grants are in place to augment your college cash fund.

Your limited credit history and low income will work against you in your bank s loan office, but publicly funded government grants are issued to students with little or no credit. Start down the path to college cash with a standardized request for financial aid called the FAFSA.

Grants for low income families

Income Contingent College Money

The Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) compiles information about your family finances, and your ability to pay for college. Income and family size are used to determine how much money your family can reasonably devote to college expenses. Your Expected Family Contribution (EFC) is used to calculate the difference between what you can afford, and what your education costs.

Your personal Student Aid Report (SAR) paints a cash-flow picture for individual colleges to use as they draw from all the available financial aid resources to create your individual financial aid offer. The first aid sources that are tapped for needy students include federal and state grants.

The Department of Education Pell Grant program provides substantial relief for low-income college students. Eligibility is determined based on the information drawn from your FAFSA. Four important criteria influence the amount of your Pell Grant:

  1. Student financial need that exceeds EFC
  2. Year-long enrollment status
  3. Full-time academic standing
  4. Cost of attending your chosen university

Pell maximums hover around $5000 per student, for each academic year, based on congressional funding. FAFSA results are generally sufficient, but some students are asked to provide additional documentation before being considered for this need-based grant.

The neediest students who file FAFSAs are considered for additional federal grant money. Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants (FSEOG) target students whose Expected Family Contribution is zero. Once applicants with this level of financial hardship are given grants, additional funds are disbursed to the next neediest groups, until the FSEOG program runs out of money. If you are counting on this aid, file your FAFSA as soon as possible, to avoid disappointment.

Other federal grants have specific eligibility requirements that go beyond financial need.

Academic Competitiveness Grants (ACG) and Science and Math Access to Retain Talent (SMART) Grants are reserved for needy applicants studying in STEM subject areas. Science, math and other technology majors who maintain rigorous academic standards during high school and college are invited to apply for these grants. Awards range from $500-$1300 annually, with ACG serving first and second year university students, and SMART grants going to juniors and seniors.

Students who have lost a parent as a result of his or her military service automatically qualify for Iraq and Afghanistan Service Grants. Financial need does not factor-in to this grant, which recognizes the service of military families.

Students entering teaching programs enjoy access to government grants aimed at bolstering the profession. Teacher shortages across the country, particularly in low-income areas, have prompted targeted efforts to recruit and train qualified educators. The Teacher Education Assistance for College and Higher Education (TEACH) program is a service-for-tuition arrangement that generously compensates college students, in exchange for their commitments to teach at low income schools.

Education majors earn four-thousand dollar grants annually by agreeing to work as teachers in critical shortage facilities for at least four years. Recipients who fail to meet their teaching obligations are required to pay their TEACH grants back, with interest.

Bad Credit Grants and Your Education

Your credit history does not determine your eligibility for government grants, but conventional loans and other financing sometimes require formal credit checks. Keep your limited credit history on the right track by paying your phone and credit card bills on-time.

If you borrow money from a private lender or through the Federal Government s Direct Loan Program, use your repayment schedule as an opportunity to build a favorable credit rating. If a loan cosigner is on board, protect his or her credit by making payments on-time. Once you illustrate regularity in paying the debt, most lenders will release your cosigner from responsibility for the loan.

Low-Income Grants from States and Other Sources

State financial aid for college students often mirrors federal programs. If you qualify for loans and grants on the federal level, then you might also be eligible for state funds.

California administers a generous student aid program that assists most of the state s college students. CalGrants helps students through the entire financial aid process, including FAFSA advising. California students tap CalGrants for general need-based grants, as well as performance-based scholarship awards offered as part of the state s Cash For College initiative.

In Wisconsin, need-based grants are issued to low-income college students without formal credit checks.

  • Wisconsin Higher Education Grants (WHEG) serve low income residents who are enrolled at least half-time, in the pursuit of undergraduate credentials at Wisconsin State Universities and Technical Colleges. The grant is renewable for up to 10 semesters, with a $3000 maximum annual value.
  • Wisconsin Tuition Grants aid students attending independent colleges and universities within the state. Financial need is a prerequisite. The program attempts to bridge the gap between public and private tuition, by extending grants to private school students.
  • Talent Incentive Program (TIP) supports Wisconsin students with the highest levels of financial need and educational dysfunction. Students are recommended for these grants by financial aid offices and counselors in the Wisconsin Educational Opportunities Program (WEOP). Freshmen receive initial awards up to $1800, and may renew for up to ten consecutive semesters. This program is funded jointly by the state and federal governments.

Universities maintain their own student aid programs, including no-credit-check grants. Your campus financial aid office is best equipped to provide current information about the financial aid opportunities that are unique to your school. Your FAFSA is the only application that s required for some state and institutional grants, but other grant funds must be requested with seperate individual applications.

And even the FAFSA is subject to multiple filing deadlines. Your state might require you to submit your FAFSA well before the federal filing date. CalGrants, for example, requires your FAFSA to be in-place by March 2nd, while you have until June 30th to file within federal limits.

To round out your quest for college assistance, search general financial aid sources like Pell and other large programs, but also consider individual traits that might make you eligible for special scholarships and grants. Some college aid is reserved for specific student groups, so take advantage of your unique features to capture the financial aid you need. Grants provide college cash for these and other student populations:


Housing Grants for Low Income Families, Home Guides, SF Gate, low income grants.#Low #income #grants

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Housing Grants for Low Income Families

The federal government, state agencies and nonprofits throughout the nation offer housing grants for families who fall under certain income limits. Most of the programs are funded by the U.S. Housing and Urban Development, HUD, and U.S. Department of Agriculture, USDA. Others are funded by donations from the general public and administered by charities.

Salvation Army

Depending on United Way funding, the Salvation Army offers rental and mortgage assistance. Applicants must present an eviction notice, proof of income, photo ID, Social Security card for each member of the family, and, if required, proof that only $200 or less remains to be paid for the current month’s rent or mortgage. Although the maximum assistance is generally $200, additional funding may be provided to those displaced from FEMA declared natural disaster areas. In addition, the Salvation Army provides long-term managed assistance for qualified individuals who were displaced from their homes due to flooding in certain geographic areas.

Rural Housing

HUD provides funding to states for rural housing grants. Very-low, low and moderate income level families may apply. Income limitations are based on a percentage of the median for the area. Rental, repair and ownership grants may be available in areas meeting rural criteria. Generally, rural areas include open country, cities with under 10,000 residents and certain cities with a maximum population of 20,000. Grant amounts vary depending on the area and need. For more specific details, contact the local HUD Public Housing Authority, or PHA, or call HUD at 800-569-4287.

Vouchers Programs

HUD offers housing grants to qualified low-income families in the form of vouchers for renting or homeownership assistance. Previously termed Section 8 Housing, the Housing Choice Voucher Program allows eligible low-income families choices as to where they want to live. HUD’s Homeownership Vouchers Program provides grants to eligible first-time home buyers. Grants may provide down payments on home loans, mortgage payment assistance and help paying for living expenses. Grant receivers may not have owned property for the previous three years and must live in the home as their primary residence. To apply, contact a HUD-approved PHA.

State Homeless Grants

States typically distribute federal funding for homeless programs to counties or municipal departments or approved businesses and non-profit organizations. The funding provides grants to eligible area families to address homeless or potentially homeless situations. Homeless families receive assistance for food, housing and medical expenses due to emergency needs. Those who are in danger of eviction may also receive assistance. Either call or visit a state’s Public Housing Authority for programs available in that state.

Disabled Vouchers

HUD provides grant assistance to eligible disabled individuals through its Designated Housing Vouchers program. Non-elderly, low-income families that include a member with disabilities who live in public housing designated for occupancy are eligible for this program. Qualified disabled individuals living alone may also apply for these vouchers. These families or individuals are enrolled into this voucher program as a special admission. Apply to the local PHA for this program.


Very Low to Moderate Income Housing Loans, home grants for low income families.#Home #grants #for

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Very Low to Moderate Income Housing Loans

Home grants for low income families

The following is a summary of information about low to moderate income housing loans available to individuals or families through the U.S. Department of Agriculture s Rural Development program as listed in the Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA).

During fiscal year 2015, a total of $18.7 billion in loans were granted. The average direct loan granted was for $125,226 while the average guaranteed loan was for $136,360.

VERY LOW TO MODERATE INCOME HOUSING LOANS

CATEGORY: Housing Assistance

To assist very low, low-income, and moderate-income households to obtain modest, decent, safe, and sanitary housing for use as a permanent residence in rural areas.

Types of Assistance

Direct Loans; Guaranteed/Insured Loans.

Uses and Restrictions

Direct and guaranteed loans may be used to buy, build, or improve the applicant s permanent residence. New manufactured homes may be financed when they are on a permanent site, purchased from an approved dealer or contractor, and meet certain other requirements. Under very limited circumstances, homes may be re-financed with direct loans. Dwellings financed must be modest, decent, safe, and sanitary. The value of a home financed with a direct loan may not exceed the area limit. The property must be located in an eligible rural area. Assistance is available in the States, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, Guam, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of Northern Mariana s, and the Trust Territories of the Pacific Islands.

Direct loans are made at the interest rate specified in RD Instruction 440.1, Exhibit B (available in any Rural Development local office), and are repaid over 33 years or 38 years for applicants whose adjusted annual income does not exceed 60 percent of the area median income, if necessary to show repayment ability.

Payment assistance is granted on direct loans to reduce the installment to an effective interest rate as low as one percent, depending on adjusted family income. Payment assistance is subject to recapture by the government when the customer no longer resides in the dwelling. There is no funding provided for deferred mortgage authority or loans for deferred mortgage assumptions. Guaranteed loans may be made to refinance either existing RHS Guaranteed Housing loans or RHS Section 502 Direct Housing loans. Guaranteed loans are amortized over 30 years. The interest rate is negotiated with the lender.

Eligibility Requirements

Applicants must have very low-, low- or moderate incomes. Very low-income is defined as below 50 percent of the area median income (AMI), low-income is between 50 and 80 percent of AMI; moderate income is below 115 percent of AMI. Families must be without adequate housing, but able to afford the housing payments, including principal, interest, taxes, and insurance (PITI). Qualifying repayment ratios are 29 percent for PITI to 41 percent for total debt. In addition, applicants must be unable to obtain credit elsewhere, yet have an acceptable credit history.

Beneficiary Eligibility

Applicants must meet eligibility requirements.

Guaranteed Loan Low and Moderate income eligible.

Credentials/Documentation

Applicants may need to submit evidence of inability to obtain credit elsewhere, verification of income, debts, and other information on the application; plans, specifications, and cost estimates. This program is excluded from coverage under 2 CFR 200, Subpart E – Cost Principles.

Application Procedures

This program is excluded from coverage under 2 CFR 200, Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards. For direct loans, application is made at the Rural Development field office serving the county where the dwelling is or will be located. For guaranteed loans, application is made to a participating private lender.

Award Procedure

Rural Development field offices have authority to approve most Direct loan requests.

Processing of guaranteed loans varies in each State. Consult your local telephone directory under U.S. Department of Agriculture for a Rural Development field office listing or visit the website http://offices.sc.egov.usda.gov/lcoator/app for a State Office listing. If no backlog exists, decisions on direct loan applications are made within 30 to 60 days. Requests for guarantee loans are acted upon in 3 days of receipt of the lender s request for guarantee.

Range of Approval/Disapproval Time

For direct loans, from 30 to 60 days subject to availability of funds, from the time the application is filed if no backlog of applications exists. A pre-qualification may be provided to potential direct loan applicants upon call or visit to a Rural Development office, though results are not binding. For guarantees, a decision is required within 3 days of loan package submission by the approved lender.

Information Contacts

Regional or Local Office Consult your local telephone directory under United States Department of Agriculture for Rural Development field office number. If no listing, contact appropriate Rural Development State Office listed in Appendix IV of the Catalog or on the internet at http://www.rurdev.usda.gov/recd_map.html.

Headquarters Office Director, Single Family Housing Direct Loan Division or Director Single Family Housing Guaranteed Loan Division, Rural Housing Service (RHS), Department of Agriculture, Washington, DC 20250. Telephone: (202) 720-1474 (direct loans), (202) 720-1452 (guaranteed loans).