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Family Income Supplement, income support form.#Income #support #form

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Family Income Supplement

Family Income Supplement (FIS) is a weekly tax-free payment available to employees with children. It gives extra financial support to people on low pay. You cannot qualify for FIS if you are only self-employed – you must be an employee to qualify.

You must have at least one child who normally lives with you or is financially supported by you. Your child must be under 18 years of age or between 18 and 22 years of age and in full-time education.

To qualify for FIS, your average weekly family income must be below a certain amount for your family size. The FIS you receive is 60% of the difference between your average weekly family income and the income limit which applies to your family. For more information about average family income see ‘Rates’ below.

Your FIS payment is not taxed. If you are getting FIS you may also be entitled to the Back to School Clothing and Footwear Allowance. Your income from FIS is not taken into account in the assessment for a medical card.

The Back to Work Family Dividend (BTWFD) and FIS can be paid together and the BTWFD will not be taken into account in the income test for FIS.

Budget 2018: the Family Income Supplement is to be renamed as the Working Family Payment. In addition, income thresholds will increase by €10 for families with up to 3 children (March 2018).

Rules

FIS is a tax-free weekly payment for employees who:

  • Work 38 or more hours per fortnight (any combination of hours that reaches 38 hours each fortnight is acceptable). You can combine your weekly hours with your spouse, civil partner, cohabitant’s hours to meet this condition. You cannot use time spent in self-employment (or on Community Employment, Gateway, Tús, JobBridge or the Rural Social Scheme) to meet this condition.
  • Where the employment is likely to last at least 3 months
  • Have one or more children who normally live with you and
  • Earn less than an amount set according to your family size

You must be employed in the Irish State and pay tax and PRSI here. Under EU regulations you may be able to claim FIS if your children are living abroad and dependent on you. Generally, the payment continues for one year (52 weeks) and is not affected by, for example, an increase or a decrease in earnings.

However, in the following 2 circumstances, your weekly rate of FIS can be revised during the year:

  • If you start to care for an additional child your FIS rate can be increased.
  • If you were getting a One-Parent Family Payment and your payment stopped because your youngest child reached the relevant OFP age limit your FIS rate can be revised (by disregarding the rate of OFP assessed in your most recent FIS income test).

Job changes

If your pay from work is reduced your Family Income Supplement (FIS) payment will stay the same. It will not increase. However, when your FIS payment ends you can re-apply giving details of your new reduced income. (FIS is usually paid for 52 weeks. At the end of the 52 weeks, you can re-apply for FIS.)

If the number of hours you work each week is reduced to below 38 hours per fortnight you are no longer entitled to FIS. You should notify the FIS section if your hours fall below this minimum requirement.

If you move to a new job, your current entitlement to FIS will cease and you must notify the FIS section. You may re-apply for FIS for your new job.

If you lose your job you are no longer entitled to FIS. You must notify the FIS section.

Getting FIS with other social welfare payments

You cannot get FIS if you are on one of the following schemes or social welfare payments:

Your spouse, civil partner or cohabitant can claim FIS while you are getting one of these payments. However an Increase for a Qualified Adult (IQA) will no longer be paid and your social welfare payment will be assessed as income for their FIS payment. Any Increase for a Qualified Child will be affected. Similarly if your spouse, civil partner or cohabitant is getting one of these payments, you can qualify for FIS but an IQA will no longer be paid for you.

You can get Illness Benefit or Injury Benefit while you are getting FIS (for 6 consecutive weeks). If you are out of work for more than 6 consecutive weeks payment of FIS is suspended until you return to work and send a final certificate into the Illness Benefit or Occupational Injury Benefit section or until your FIS award period expires (whichever is the earlier).

Under the Maternity Protection Act 1994, a woman on maternity or adoptive leave is entitled to be treated as if she is in employment. This means that she can claim FIS (provided she meets the conditions of the FIS payment and has a family – a pregnant woman who has no other children does not qualify for FIS until the birth of the baby). Your income must be less than the income limit for your family size and is normally calculated using your gross earnings to date or your P60. Your FIS claim will then be paid for 52 weeks from the date you applied. You are not entitled to continue to claim FIS if you take additional unpaid maternity or adoptive leave, if you lose your job after returning to work or give up your employment.

Maintenance

A separated parent can apply for FIS once he or she meets the qualifying conditions and

Wholly maintaining means that maintenance paid by you, the FIS applicant, must be the main income of your ex-spouse, ex-civil partner or ex-cohabitant. Your former spouse or partner cannot have more than €100 a week income in their own right and cannot be married, in a civil partnership or cohabiting.

FIS is awarded for 52 weeks. A person included in your FIS award cannot be paid FIS in their own right or be included in another FIS claim during that 52 week period.

If you are a separated parent and paying maintenance you may qualify for FIS. To qualify you must be wholly maintaining the parent with whom the children are living. Only one FIS payment can be made for a family so the parent to whom you are paying maintenance must not be getting FIS. You must supply written evidence from this person to show that they are getting maintenance.

If you are paying maintenance as a result of a court order or legally binding agreement for a second family, the amount of that maintenance payment will not be deducted from the income to be assessed for FIS.

A parent getting maintenance for a qualified child will also have that maintenance assessed for FIS.

Rates

FIS is calculated on the basis of 60% of the difference between the income limit for the family size and the assessable income of the person(s) raising the child(ren). The combined income of a couple (married, in a civil partnership or cohabiting) is taken into account.

Income from any source (except for the disregards stated below) is assessed. The FIS income test does not assess capital. This includes property you own, bank accounts and cars. The Department of Employment Affairs and Social Protection (DEASP) does assess income you get from tenants who rent a property you own, it may examine your bank accounts to check for other income sources and it may assess income derived from use of a car that you own (for example as a taxi).

The main items counted as income are:

  • Your assessable earnings and your spouse, civil partner or cohabitant’s assessable earnings. (Assessable earnings are gross pay minus tax, employee PRSI, Universal Social Charge and superannuation (including the Public Service Pension Levy.) Income from working as a home help is included.
  • Any extra income you or your spouse, civil partner or cohabitant have from employment (such as pay for overtime, bonuses, allowances or commission).
  • Any income you or your spouse, civil partner or cohabitant may have from self-employment.
  • Income from occupational pensions.
  • Income you or your spouse, civil partner or cohabitant may have including social welfare payments and student grants.
  • All family income from carer’s payments (Carer’s Allowance or Carer’s Benefit).
  • Rental income from the letting of property or land (the capital value is not assessed). The gross rental income is assessed and you cannot deduct mortgage payments or other expenses. Rental income from renting a room in your house is included.

The following payments do not count as family income:

Calculating income for FIS

The Department of Employment Affairs and Social Protection (DEASP) calculates your assessable earnings over a certain period of time.

Because FIS is paid over 52 weeks the DEASP tries to calculate your average earnings over a similar period of time. Normally they will use your latest P60 or your gross earnings up to the date of your application. If you are newly in employment, your average weekly income is calculated from when you started work with that employer.

Your P60 is also used to calculate your average weekly income when your claim is being renewed. If your spouse, civil partner or cohabitant is self-employed, his or her income over the 12-month period before you lodge your claim is used to work out his or her average weekly income.


Claiming Income Support Benefit, claim income support.#Claim #income #support

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Income Support

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Claiming income support. How do I do it ?

In England, Wales and Scotland, you usually have to make a claim for Income Support by phone. There is a freephone number to use which is: 0800 055 6688 or textphone 0800 023 4888. There is also a Welsh language line number which is 0800 012 1888. You can also get a claim form (form A1) from the Department for Work and Pensions website at www.dwp.gov.uk, but you will have to print it off in order to sign it. Or you can claim online – go to the DWP website at: www.dwp.gov.uk.

You may be able to get the claim form from your local Jobcentre Plus office but if you do go to the office, you’ll be encouraged to use a public telephone or a special telephone to make your claim.

In Northern Ireland, you claim Income Support from your local Jobs and Benefits Office or Social Security Office. You can download a claim form from the Department for Social Development website at: www.dsdni.gov.uk.

If you are reclaiming Income Support within 26 weeks of getting it and there has been no change in your circumstances, you can complete a simpler and shorter ‘Rapid Reclaim’ form instead when you go to your local Jobcentre Plus office. This might apply if you have taken up a job or increased your hours but it has not worked out and you need to go back on benefit.

When you claim Income Support, you will have to provide your national insurance number, and the national insurance number of your partner if you are claiming as a couple. If you don’t know your national insurance number, but you think you have one, try to provide information that will help the office find your number. If you do not have a national insurance number, you will have to apply for one. To show that your number belongs to you, or to apply for a number, you will also have to provide evidence of your identity, for example, a birth certificate.

For information on how to apply for a national insurance number and on problems with proving your identity, see National insurance – contributions and benefits.

You will have to provide other evidence as part of your Income Support claim, for example, evidence of your income. If you don’t have this available straight away, don’t worry as you can supply it afterwards, but it is important to do so within one month of your claim to get all the money you are entitled to.

If you have problems providing a national insurance number or any of the other evidence you are asked for, or if you would like help with making your Income Support claim, you should consult an experienced adviser, for example, at a Citizens Advice Bureau. To search for details of your nearest CAB.

Getting Income Support backdated

You may be able to get some Income Support for a period before you make your claim if you could have claimed earlier and have reasons for claiming late. These have to be particular reasons laid down in law which are accepted by the benefits office, for example, you have language difficulties, or you were given wrong advice which made you think you would not get any money. Getting benefit for a period before you claim is called ‘backdating’. You will not get any backdated benefit just because you did not know that you could make a claim.

If you do have one of the accepted reasons for backdating your claim, your income support may be backdated by up to a maximum of one or three months depending on the reason you failed to claim earlier. You will have to show that you met the entitlement conditions throughout the period of backdating. You should explain that you are claiming backdated income support, and why, on your claim form.

If you want to claim backdated income support, you should consult an experienced adviser, for example, at a Citizens Advice Bureau.

Checks on Income Support, change of circumstances and fraud

You may commit a benefit fraud if you deliberately give incorrect or misleading information, or fail to report a change of circumstances. Even if you are not committing fraud, you can cause an overpayment which will have to be repaid. Your circumstances can be checked at any time while you are claiming and fraud officers can also get information about you from other government agencies and from your employer, bank or utility companies. Benefit fraud is a criminal offence and you can be prosecuted or asked to pay a penalty. If you are being investigated for benefit fraud, your benefit will be suspended. If you are convicted of benefit fraud more than once, your benefit can be reduced or stopped in the future.

If you are worried about whether you might be suspected of fraud, you are under investigation or you have been convicted, or if you have been asked to repay an overpayment of benefit, you should consult an experienced adviser, for example, at a Citizens’ Advice Bureau. To search for details of your nearest CAB, including those that can give advice by email, click on nearest CAB.

Housing Benefit, Council Tax Benefit and Housing Benefit for Rates

When you claim Income Support in England, Wales and Scotland, the person you speak to should also help you claim Housing Benefit and Council Tax Benefit. In Northern Ireland, they should help you to claim Housing Benefit for Rates.

They will send your details to the local authority so that they can assess whether you can get any of these benefits. However, if you want to claim these benefits, it might be best to get hold of the local authority’s own claim forms for Housing Benefit, Council Tax Benefit or Housing Benefit for Rates and return these to the local authority directly. This helps to avoid delays and makes sure that the claim is registered as soon as possible.

For more information about Housing Benefit, see Help with your rent – Housing benefit. For more information about Council Tax Benefit, see Help with your Council Tax – Council Tax Benefit.

Company Registration no: 06507069 Data Protection Registration no: Z129570X


Income Support Call Connection Service, claim income support.#Claim #income #support

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Income Support Contact Number

The Income Support helpline can be contacted by phone: Open Monday-Friday 8:00 AM-6:00 PM.

Income Support Telephone Helpline Hours

The Income Support phone number is available to take your call Monday-Friday – 8:00 AM-6:00 PM. Holiday hours may differ.

Tips for Contacting Income Support

• Please remember to have your personal details with you. This will include your National Insurance number, along with your full name, date of birth and details that may be pertinent to your claim, such as tenancy contracts, employment information and other income source details.

• If you have a claim, make sure you have all the information that you need to make that claim, before you ring the Income Support number.

Frequently Asked Questions

Am I eligible to make a claim?

You may be able to claim if you answer “yes” to ALL of the following:

• Are you between 16 and pension age?

• Do you work less than 16 hours per week and your partner works less than 24 hours per week?

• Do you live in England, Scotland or Wales?

• Are you a single parent with a child under 5 or a carer or pregnant?

• You have little or no income and less than £16000 in savings?

If you re unclear about these criteria, contact Income Support helpline and talk with an advisor about making a claim.

Do I need to notify Income Support if my circumstances change?

Yes, you need to call the Income Support telephone number immediately if any of the following apply to you:

• Your income has changed

• Your savings has changed

• Someone has moved into or out of your home

• You recently became employed

How do I get paid?

You will be paid via a bank transfer. There are two payments, a personal allowance payment and premiums.

As of 2016, here are the latest payment amounts:


Income Support Call Connection Service, how to claim income support.#How #to #claim #income #support

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Income Support Contact Number

The Income Support helpline can be contacted by phone: Open Monday-Friday 8:00 AM-6:00 PM.

Income Support Telephone Helpline Hours

The Income Support phone number is available to take your call Monday-Friday – 8:00 AM-6:00 PM. Holiday hours may differ.

Tips for Contacting Income Support

• Please remember to have your personal details with you. This will include your National Insurance number, along with your full name, date of birth and details that may be pertinent to your claim, such as tenancy contracts, employment information and other income source details.

• If you have a claim, make sure you have all the information that you need to make that claim, before you ring the Income Support number.

Frequently Asked Questions

Am I eligible to make a claim?

You may be able to claim if you answer “yes” to ALL of the following:

• Are you between 16 and pension age?

• Do you work less than 16 hours per week and your partner works less than 24 hours per week?

• Do you live in England, Scotland or Wales?

• Are you a single parent with a child under 5 or a carer or pregnant?

• You have little or no income and less than £16000 in savings?

If you re unclear about these criteria, contact Income Support helpline and talk with an advisor about making a claim.

Do I need to notify Income Support if my circumstances change?

Yes, you need to call the Income Support telephone number immediately if any of the following apply to you:

• Your income has changed

• Your savings has changed

• Someone has moved into or out of your home

• You recently became employed

How do I get paid?

You will be paid via a bank transfer. There are two payments, a personal allowance payment and premiums.

As of 2016, here are the latest payment amounts:


Child Support Calculator, Estimator, Child Support Australia, income support calculator.#Income #support #calculator

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income support calculator

The child support calculator estimates how much child support you pay or receive if you are an Australian separated parent. It applies the basic formula, as defined by the Department of Human Services (DHS) – see How It Works.

  • The calculator / estimator is not designed for cases involving parents with multiple child support arrangements.
  • Parents who have additional children living at home will have a lower liability or higher entitlement than indicated.
  • A parent who receives an income support payment (such as Newstart) and has low reported income pays (i) nothing if they have at least regular care (at least 2 nights per fortnight) or (ii) $420 per child per year (2017 rate).

The calculator offers a reliable estimate of child support for the vast majority of parents, with the caveats above, and noting:

  • Child support assessments normally just use the variables identified in the calculator form: taxable incomes, number and ages of children, and percentages of nights spent with each parent.
  • The formula has been applied exactly as defined by the Australian Government.

For anyone entering into an arrangement involving a government assessment, the DHS will ultimately determine the exact amounts payable or receivable. Assessments are based on the information supplied by parents and any other relevant information available.

Income sharing and hybrid models

Alternative assessments are provided using income sharing and hybrid models. These models correct for conceptual and mathematical flaws in Australia’s child support scheme. For further detail, see A Fairer System.

Purpose of child support

The Child Support Scheme was designed to ensure that both parents contribute to the cost of their children, according to their capacity. There are approximately 1.3 million parents and 1.1 million children involved in the Scheme, and more than 40 per cent of Australian families who receive Family Tax Benefit include a child support parent.

The Child Support Program was introduced in Australia in 1988 to strike a fairer balance between public and private forms of support for children [and] to alleviate the poverty of sole parent families. The Program has undergone a range of changes since its original introduction in the late 1980s, including the substantial changes on 1 July 2008 to the child support formula and the introduction of the Costs of the Children Table.

Maximum support

The maximum child support payable is also known as the “cap”. The maximum child support is applied to the combined income of both parents up to 2.5 times the annual equivalent of all Male Total Average Weekly Earnings (MTAWE) and calculated using the Costs of Children Table.

CSA vs private collect

Separated parents will be registered with the CSA if either parent makes an application to the CSA for a child support assessment. Parents can choose whether to have child support paid via private arrangement between parents (“private collect agreement”), or have it collected from the non-resident parent by the CSA and paid to the resident parent (“CSA collect agreement”). According to the CSA’s administrative data, [47%] of child support cases registered with the CSA were CSA collect cases; the remaining [53%] were private collect.

Fair or unfair assessment?

Here is an income and care scenario which highlights issues with the child support formula. For more examples, see the examples page.

  • The parents have shared care of 3 children, who spend 9 nights out of 14 with their mother.
  • Basic child-raising costs were estimated based on formula costs for parents on average incomes.
  • Both parents are on good incomes, with the father earning $25,000 more.
  • Child support payments leave the mother in a significantly stronger financial position.

Income support calculator

Income support calculator

Child support was estimated using the calculator on this page (2016 version). The calculator was also used to estimate child-raising costs – as the Costs of the Children for parents with a combined taxable income of 5/3 x annualised MTAWE (and cost % = care %). Taxes were estimated using personal income tax tables and the Medicare Levy.


Benefits and tax credits you can claim as a carer – Money Advice Service, am

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Benefits and tax credits you can claim as a carer

If you’re a carer there is financial support out there to help you. Find out what’s available and how to apply for your entitlements.

Carer’s Allowance

Did you know?

Millions of pounds of carers’ benefits go unclaimed every year, according to Age UK.

Carer’s Allowance is £62.70 a week in 2017/18.

You might be able to claim it if you:

  • Spend at least 35 hours a week caring for someone
  • Are aged 16 or over
  • Aren’t in full-time education or studying for 21 hours a week or more.
  • Earn £116 a week or less (after taxes, care costs while you’re at work and 50% of what you pay into your pension)

The person you’re caring for must also be getting a benefit because of their illness or disability, for example:

  • Attendance Allowance
  • Disability Living Allowance, or
  • Personal Independence Payment.

Carer’s Allowance is taxable and can also affect other benefits you might be already getting so you might be paid less in another benefit. It can also affect the benefits of the person you’re caring for.

You cannot usually get Carer’s Allowance if you are already claiming State Pension or certain income-replacing benefits such as contribution-based Employment and Support Allowance.

However, it’s still worth making a claim, although you will not get the benefit. If you qualify in all other respects then you might be entitled to top up income on other benefits you receive.

Your local Jobcentre Plus (or Jobs and Benefits Office in Northern Ireland) will be able to tell you which benefits to apply for.

Carer’s Credit

Carer’s Credit is a National Insurance credit towards your State Pension while you’re not making any contributions because of your caring role.

You might be able to get Carer’s Credit if:

  • You are aged 16 or over
  • You aren’t yet getting State Pension
  • You don’t qualify for Carer’s Allowance
  • You spend at least 20 hours a week caring for someone
  • The person you are looking after receives a benefit because of their illness or disability, for example, Attendance Allowance, Disability Living Allowance or Personal Independence Payment. If the person you’re caring for doesn’t get one of these benefits then you might still be able to claim by completing a ‘Care Certificate’.

Carer Premium

You might be entitled to an additional Carer Premium if you already get:

  • Income Support
  • Universal Credit
  • Housing Benefit
  • Council Tax Support
  • Income-based Jobseeker’s Allowance
  • Income-related Employment and Support Allowance

Ask about the Carer Premium at your local Jobcentre Plus or Jobs and Benefits Office.

Pension Credit

This is a benefit you can get if you have reached your State Pension age.

It’s made up of two parts: Guarantee Credit and Savings Credit.

Savings Credit is only payable if you or your partner reached State Pension age before 6 April 2016.

How much you’ll get depends on your income and savings and whether you’re single or have a husband, wife or civil partner.

If you get Pension Credit, you may be able to get the additional amount for carers added to it, if you claim Carer’s Allowance or have an underlying entitlement to it.

Local welfare assistance

If you have an unexpected and urgent financial need, you might be able to get local help. This is called local welfare assistance.

  • If you live in England, contact your local council to find out more about what help they might be able to provide.
  • If you live in Scotland, find out more about the Scottish Welfare Fund on the Scottish Government website.
  • If you live in Wales, find out more about the Discretionary Assistance Fund on the Money Made Clear website.
  • If you live in Northern Ireland, learn more about the Social Fund on the nidirect website.

Other benefits you might be able to claim

As a carer, there are other benefits and support you might be eligible for. Getting Carer’s Allowance might affect how much you get in these benefits.

Income Support

If you’re on a low income and below State Pension age, you might be able to claim this means-tested benefit. Income Support is non-taxable.

Employment and Support Allowance

You might be eligible for income-related Employment and Support Allowance (ESA) if you have your own health problems as well as caring responsibilities. You might not get Carer’s Allowance if you’re getting contribution-based ESA.

Jobseeker’s Allowance

If you’re caring for someone while looking for work you might be able to claim income-related Jobseeker’s Allowance. It’s taxable and means-tested.

Tax credits

If you’re on a low income, you might be entitled to Working Tax Credit to top up your income. It’s means-tested and non-taxable.

Universal Credit

Universal Credit is a new financial support for people in or out of work, which replaces Income Support, Employment and Support Allowance, Jobseeker’s Allowance, Housing Benefit and tax credits.

Housing Benefit

Housing Benefit can help you pay part or all of your rent if you’re on a low income.

Help if you’re struggling to pay your mortgage

If you’re struggling to pay your mortgage, you may be able to get a loan from the government to pay the interest on it, if you’re on any of these benefits:

  • Income Support
  • Income-based Jobseeker’s Allowance
  • Income-related Employment and Support Allowance
  • Pension Credit
  • Universal Credit

This help is called ‘Support for Mortgage Interest’ (SMI). There is a 39-week waiting period after you’ve claimed before you receive any money.

Other help if you’re on a low income

You might also be entitled to financial help with your:

Other schemes and entitlements

Motability scheme

If you’re caring for someone with limited mobility, they might be able to get support from the Motability scheme.

This can help provide a:

Blue badge parking

Blue badge parking permits allow drivers who have passengers with mobility issues to park in more convenient locations, such as disabled parking bays.

You can also park on single or double lines for up to three hours.

Disabled Persons Railcard

The Disabled Persons Railcard entitles the cardholder and a carer or companion one third off most adult rail fares on the National Rail network.

It costs £20 a year or £54 for a three-year card. You can buy one at any staffed ticket office or apply online.

Cinema Exhibitors’ Association Card

This card entitles you to one free ticket when you take the person you’re caring for to the cinema. You can apply for the card online, and all national cinema chains accept it.

Other discounts

There are lots more free or discounted entry offers available to carers at museums, leisure centres and National Trust sites across the country, although they aren’t always advertised.

Just ask when you’re buying tickets.

Several local authorities also offer carers’ shopping, leisure and other discounts, Ask your local authority what extra support is available.

Where to get help and advice about benefits

Claiming carers benefits can be complicated and you might need an expert benefits check to make sure you are getting the right entitlements.

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    Government Launches New Supplement for Low Income Residents, low income support.#Low #income #support

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    low income support

    Low income support

    Low income support

    Budget 2016 Protecting Our Vulnerable Residents

    Government Launches New Supplement for Low Income Residents

    To support low income seniors, individuals, families and persons with disabilities, the Provincial Government is establishing a Newfoundland and Labrador Income Supplement. Budget 2016 includes an annualized investment of $63.7 million to assist the most vulnerable residents impacted by budget revenue measures. Budget 2016 also includes an annualized investment of $12.7 million to enhance the existing Seniors Benefit. Annualized, the total additions to these programs are $76.4 million.

    Our government recognizes some low income residents in Newfoundland and Labrador will be more affected by the impact of new and increased revenue measures announced in Budget 2016. To ensure we are protecting the most vulnerable in our society, we are investing $76.4 million in a Newfoundland and Labrador Income Supplement, a disability benefit and enhancements to the Seniors Benefit that will be paid directly to eligible low income seniors, individuals, families and persons with disabilities in quarterly installments.

    – The Honourable Cathy Bennett, Minister of Finance and President of Treasury Board

    The Newfoundland and Labrador Income Supplement will be based on family net income and will be payable directly to eligible individuals on a quarterly basis. Examples of those who will receive the Newfoundland and Labrador Income Supplement are included in the backgrounder below.

    As a government we have a responsibility to ensure there is a plan in place to address the unprecedented fiscal challenges facing Newfoundland and Labrador. However, we also have an obligation to protect our low income seniors, individuals, families and persons with disabilities by providing these necessary new revenue measures. We must always, as a society, ensure those that need help the most receive it. That s why we created this income supplement.

    The Newfoundland and Labrador Income Supplement will be effective July 1, 2016 and eligible recipients will receive their first payment in October 2016. No application for the supplement is required. However, eligible individuals must ensure their annual income tax return is filed in order to receive the supplement.

    • Budget 2016 includes an annualized investment of $63.7 million to assist the most vulnerable residents impacted by budget revenue measures. Budget 2016 also includes an annualized investment of $12.7 million to enhance the existing Seniors Benefit. Annualized, the total additions to these programs are $76.4 million.
    • The Newfoundland and Labrador Income Supplement will be based on family net income and will be payable directly to eligible individuals on a quarterly basis.
    • The Income Supplement will be effective July 1, 2016. Eligible recipients will receive their first payment, consisting of two quarterly payments in October 2016.

    Income Support, income support claim.#Income #support #claim

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    Income Support

    Income support claim

    Patient is a certified member of

    The Information Standard

    Ros Jones, 14 Jun 2012

    Income Support is a benefit paid to people who are not in full-time work, whose income falls below a prescribed level, and who meet certain conditions. If you receive Income Support, you are also entitled to certain other benefits – for example, Housing Benefit, Council Tax Benefit and help with health costs. Note: this leaflet gives a brief summary of Income Support and is for guidance only. It does not cover all situations, nor is it a full statement of the law. If you are not sure if you qualify, or whether you qualify for other benefits, then seek expert advice. Sources of further more detailed information are given at the end.

    In this article

    • arrow-downWho is Income Support intended for?
    • arrow-downHow is Income Support worked out?
    • arrow-downIf I get Income Support, what else am I entitled to?
    • arrow-downHow is Income Support paid?
    • arrow-downHow can I claim Income Support?
    • arrow-downFurther information, help and advice

    Who is Income Support intended for?

    Income Support is intended for people who cannot normally work (or who work fewer than 16 hours a week), and who are on a low income. For example, if you:

    • Are incapable of work due to illness or disability.
    • Care for a sick or disabled person.
    • Are a lone parent responsible for a child under 16.

    You must be between 16 and 59 to claim Income Support. Between 2010 and 2020 the maximum age up to which men and women will be able to receive Income Support will rise in line with the increase in women’s State Pension age from 60 to 65 and the further increase to 66 for men and women. People aged 60 (gradually going up to 66) and over may be able to claim other benefits such as Pension Credit.

    How is Income Support worked out?

    Income Support is means-tested and depends on your circumstances. Regulations approved by Parliament specify how much you should have coming in for your basic living expenses. This depends upon age, family size, disabilities, etc. If the money coming in is less than this amount, you will get Income Support to make up the difference. However, some income is ignored (such as Attendance Allowance and Disability Living Allowance) and some income only taken partly into account (such as part-time earnings and some charitable payments).

    • Work 16 hours or more a week.
    • Have a spouse or partner working 24 hours a week or more.
    • Are a full-time student, unless you are also a lone parent or disabled.
    • Have savings of 16,000 or more.

    Income Support does not cover rent and Council Tax. However, if you are getting Income Support you can get help with these from separate Housing Benefit and Council Tax Benefit schemes run by the local authority. If you are buying your home, an amount for the interest part of your mortgage payments may be added into the calculation of your Income Support entitlement.

    If I get Income Support, what else am I entitled to?

    You are entitled to certain other benefits. For example:

    • Housing Benefit and Council Tax Benefit.
    • Help with health costs. For example, free prescriptions, free NHS dental treatment, vouchers for glasses, and help with fares to hospital if you have hospital appointments.
    • Grants and loans from the Social Fund.
    • Free school meals for your children.

    Even though you may only be due a small amount of Income Support, it may be worth claiming because of these fringe benefits.

    How is Income Support paid?

    Income Support is normally paid directly into a bank account, building society account, post office account, or national savings account. However, in some situations you may get cheque payments that you can cash at a post office if you do not have any of these accounts.

    How can I claim Income Support?

    To claim for Income Support:

    • Get a claim form from your local Jobcentre Plus.
    • Call free on 0800 055 66 88 (8.00am to 6.00pm Monday to Friday) or 0800 0234 888 for textphone, but note textphones can’t receive text messages from mobile phones.

    Further information, help and advice

    Directgov

    Directgov provides information from across UK government departments on topics ranging from travel safety and parental leave, to special educational needs, local NHS services, and benefits. The site also brings together an increasing number of online government services – including being able to download and/or complete certain benefit claim forms online.

    Citizens Advice Bureau

    Provides independent advice on many issues including benefits. Listed in the phone book under ‘Citizens Advice Bureaux’. Also, see their website: www.citizensadvice.org.uk

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    Income Support: 0843 504 7178, Contact Numbers Guru, income support claim.#Income #support #claim

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    Contact Numbers Guru

    Phone the Jobcentre Plus on 0843 504 7178 for general enquiries and support relating to your Income Support.

    If you need to make a new application for Income Support, call their new claims hotline on freephone number 08000 55 66 88.

    Income Support is a state benefit that was introduced in 1988. It is paid to recipients who are not actively seeking work and, therefore, are not entitled to JSA or ESA. It is administered by Jobcentre Plus.

    Frequently Asked Questions

    1. What is the aim of the Income Support benefit?

    Income Support is paid to individuals/couples, who are at risk of their income falling below the minimum amount the law says an individual/couple can live on. Income Support payments will bridge the gap between an individual/couple s income and this legal minimum.

  • What is the difference between JSA/ESA and Income Support?

    JSA and ESA are benefits that are paid to people to support them during periods of unemployment whilst they actively prepare themselves for being ready for work (in the case of ESA), or actively look for work (in the case of JSA). By contrast people who are on Income Support are not -usually actively looking for work and, therefore, are not entitled to JSA or ESA. A recipient of Income Support will not be required to sign on.

  • What are the qualifying conditions for Income Support?

    In order to qualify for Income Support you will need to be unemployed, or working less than 16 hours a week. Plus your partner must work 24 hours or less per week. You must have less than £16,000 in savings; anyone with more than £16,000 in saving will automatically be disqualified from claiming Income Support. You must be between the ages of 16 and 66.

  • Are there any special, or unusual, qualifying conditions for Income Support?

    Yes. You can claim Income Support if you are not in a position to apply for work, due to sleeping rough. You can also apply for Income Support if you are a refugee who has recently moved to the UK and will need time to learn English before you can realistically apply for work. Some people qualify for Income support if they are a lone parent and have specific household duties that would make it too difficult for them to hold down full time work.

  • My Wife/Partner has savings of £16,000 or above, but I don t, can I qualify for Income Support?

    In these circumstances you will not qualify for Income Support. If you are married, or living as a couple, then that person is classed in law as your partner and their savings will be used in any Income Support calculation that you make.

  • What are the rates of Income Support for a single person?

    For a single person aged between 16 and 24 the weekly rate of payment is £57.35. The weekly rate of payment for recipients who are 25 or over is £72.40.

  • I live with my partner, can we claim Income Support seperately? No, although both of your savings, income and capital, will be used to calculate your Income Support rate, payment can only be made to you or your partner you can not both receive Income Support.
  • I have a job, but I only work a few hours a week and it is badly paid. Can I receive Income Support if I m working?

    Yes, but only if you are working under 16 hours a week, and your partner is not working more than 24 hours a week.

  • My partner and I have children can we be paid more than the basic rate of Income Support?

    You won t necessarily be paid more Income Support, however a household that qualifies for Income Support and has one child or more will qualify for Child Tax Credits.

  • What are the Higher rates of Income Support?

    The Higher rate for a couple, both of whom are under 18, is £86.65 (as opposed to the basic rate of £57.35). The Higher rate for couples over 18 is £113.70. You can also claim Higher rate Income Support if you, or your partner is responsible for one child or more.

  • Contact Details for Income Support

    The easiest way to apply for Income Support is by phone. You can contact the Income support helpline by ringing Jobcentre Plus.

    Jobcentre Plus: 0843 504 7178 (existing claims) / 0800 055 6688 (new claims)

    When you call either of these numbers you will be directed to an automated call distribution menu that will present you with a series of numbered options. One of these options will be for Income Support. If you are calling to make a new claim you will be directed to an advisor who will walk you through your application.

    Alternatively, you can also apply by post. Fill in this form form A1 and send it to your local Jobcentre Plus.

    Contact Numbers Guru is a telephone directory and call routing service and is not affiliated with any of the businesses listed inside.

    Calls to our 0843 numbers cost 7p/minute and our 0870 numbers cost 13p/minute, plus your phone company’s access charge.

    The official contact number for each company featured can be found in the public domain or on their official website.


    Claiming Income Support Benefit, claiming income support.#Claiming #income #support

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    Income Support

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    Claiming income support. How do I do it ?

    In England, Wales and Scotland, you usually have to make a claim for Income Support by phone. There is a freephone number to use which is: 0800 055 6688 or textphone 0800 023 4888. There is also a Welsh language line number which is 0800 012 1888. You can also get a claim form (form A1) from the Department for Work and Pensions website at www.dwp.gov.uk, but you will have to print it off in order to sign it. Or you can claim online – go to the DWP website at: www.dwp.gov.uk.

    You may be able to get the claim form from your local Jobcentre Plus office but if you do go to the office, you’ll be encouraged to use a public telephone or a special telephone to make your claim.

    In Northern Ireland, you claim Income Support from your local Jobs and Benefits Office or Social Security Office. You can download a claim form from the Department for Social Development website at: www.dsdni.gov.uk.

    If you are reclaiming Income Support within 26 weeks of getting it and there has been no change in your circumstances, you can complete a simpler and shorter ‘Rapid Reclaim’ form instead when you go to your local Jobcentre Plus office. This might apply if you have taken up a job or increased your hours but it has not worked out and you need to go back on benefit.

    When you claim Income Support, you will have to provide your national insurance number, and the national insurance number of your partner if you are claiming as a couple. If you don’t know your national insurance number, but you think you have one, try to provide information that will help the office find your number. If you do not have a national insurance number, you will have to apply for one. To show that your number belongs to you, or to apply for a number, you will also have to provide evidence of your identity, for example, a birth certificate.

    For information on how to apply for a national insurance number and on problems with proving your identity, see National insurance – contributions and benefits.

    You will have to provide other evidence as part of your Income Support claim, for example, evidence of your income. If you don’t have this available straight away, don’t worry as you can supply it afterwards, but it is important to do so within one month of your claim to get all the money you are entitled to.

    If you have problems providing a national insurance number or any of the other evidence you are asked for, or if you would like help with making your Income Support claim, you should consult an experienced adviser, for example, at a Citizens Advice Bureau. To search for details of your nearest CAB.

    Getting Income Support backdated

    You may be able to get some Income Support for a period before you make your claim if you could have claimed earlier and have reasons for claiming late. These have to be particular reasons laid down in law which are accepted by the benefits office, for example, you have language difficulties, or you were given wrong advice which made you think you would not get any money. Getting benefit for a period before you claim is called ‘backdating’. You will not get any backdated benefit just because you did not know that you could make a claim.

    If you do have one of the accepted reasons for backdating your claim, your income support may be backdated by up to a maximum of one or three months depending on the reason you failed to claim earlier. You will have to show that you met the entitlement conditions throughout the period of backdating. You should explain that you are claiming backdated income support, and why, on your claim form.

    If you want to claim backdated income support, you should consult an experienced adviser, for example, at a Citizens Advice Bureau.

    Checks on Income Support, change of circumstances and fraud

    You may commit a benefit fraud if you deliberately give incorrect or misleading information, or fail to report a change of circumstances. Even if you are not committing fraud, you can cause an overpayment which will have to be repaid. Your circumstances can be checked at any time while you are claiming and fraud officers can also get information about you from other government agencies and from your employer, bank or utility companies. Benefit fraud is a criminal offence and you can be prosecuted or asked to pay a penalty. If you are being investigated for benefit fraud, your benefit will be suspended. If you are convicted of benefit fraud more than once, your benefit can be reduced or stopped in the future.

    If you are worried about whether you might be suspected of fraud, you are under investigation or you have been convicted, or if you have been asked to repay an overpayment of benefit, you should consult an experienced adviser, for example, at a Citizens’ Advice Bureau. To search for details of your nearest CAB, including those that can give advice by email, click on nearest CAB.

    Housing Benefit, Council Tax Benefit and Housing Benefit for Rates

    When you claim Income Support in England, Wales and Scotland, the person you speak to should also help you claim Housing Benefit and Council Tax Benefit. In Northern Ireland, they should help you to claim Housing Benefit for Rates.

    They will send your details to the local authority so that they can assess whether you can get any of these benefits. However, if you want to claim these benefits, it might be best to get hold of the local authority’s own claim forms for Housing Benefit, Council Tax Benefit or Housing Benefit for Rates and return these to the local authority directly. This helps to avoid delays and makes sure that the claim is registered as soon as possible.

    For more information about Housing Benefit, see Help with your rent – Housing benefit. For more information about Council Tax Benefit, see Help with your Council Tax – Council Tax Benefit.

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